Diseases

LDL cholesterol

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Martina Feichter

Martina Feichter studied biology in Innsbruck with an optional subject in pharmacy and also immersed herself in the world of medicinal plants. From there it was not far to other medical topics that still captivate her today. She trained as a journalist at the Axel Springer Academy in Hamburg and has been working for lifelikeinc.com since 2007 - first as an editor and since 2012 as a freelance author.

More about the lifelikeinc.com expertsLDL cholesterol is one of the transporters (lipoproteins) for cholesterol in the blood. Despite its vital properties, it is considered to be bad cholesterol because it favors arteriosclerosis. Read more about the importance of LDL cholesterol and the validity of different LDL values!

ArtikelübersichtLDL cholesterol

  • What is LDL cholesterol?
  • When do you determine LDL cholesterol?
  • Blood levels - LDL
  • When is LDL cholesterol too low?
  • When is LDL cholesterol too high?

What is LDL cholesterol?

LDL cholesterol is a lipoprotein, a compound of fats (like cholesterol) and proteins (proteins). Only in such a package water-insoluble substances such as cholesterol esters can be transported in aqueous blood. Other lipoproteins include HDL cholesterol and VLDL cholesterol. The latter is the precursor for LDL:

The liver initially produces VLDL (Very Low Density Lipoproteins), which is loaded with cholesterol and other fats (triglycerides). By breaking down the triglycerides by certain enzymes and changes in the structure of the lipoprotein, LDL cholesterol is produced via an intermediate stage. Its task is the transport of cholesterol from the liver to the body cells. These need the cholesterol to build up the cell membrane and to produce various hormones (like estrogen).

Normally, cells regulate the uptake of cholesterol by no longer presenting receptors on their surplus for their uptake on their surface. At the same time, cholesterol production in the liver is inhibited when the blood cholesterol level is sufficient.

However, if LDL cholesterol is too high, these mechanisms are no longer sufficient. The excess cholesterol deposits, inter alia, in the arterial walls. The result is vascular calcification (arteriosclerosis), which can cause a variety of other diseases such as heart attack or stroke.

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When do you determine LDL cholesterol?

The LDL cholesterol level is particularly important if the doctor wants to assess the risk of atherosclerosis. The LDL value is also determined in case of suspected lipid metabolism disorders or to control the success of a fat lowering therapy (for example by diet or medication).

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