Diseases

Dupuytren's contracture

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The Dupuytren's contracture (also Dupuytren's disease, Dupuytren's contracture, Dupuytren's disease) is a disease of the tendons of the hand. By shortening the tendon structures in the palm of the hand, patients lose the ability to stretch their fingers. An operation can improve the symptoms. Often, however, the symptoms reappear after a period of time. Read all about the symptoms and treatment of Dupuytren contracture here!

ICD codes for this disease: ICD codes are internationally valid medical diagnosis codes. They are found e.g. in medical reports or on incapacity certificates. M72ArtikelübersichtDupuytren's contracture

  • description
  • symptoms
  • Causes and risk factors
  • Examinations and diagnosis
  • treatment
  • Disease course and prognosis

Dupuytren Contracture: Description

The Dupuytren contracture is a disease of the hand tendons, which was named after Guillaume Dupuytren. The French doctor first reported his illness to the students in 1831. Dupuytren's contracture affects mostly men over the age of 50 years. In women, the disease is generally milder and occurs only at a higher age. Northern Europeans are more likely to develop Dupuytren's disease than people of other races.

The word contracture comes from the Latin "contrahere", which means "to contract". It describes in medicine the shortening or shrinkage of structures such as muscles or tendons. This change restricts mobility in the joints.

The Dupuytren contracture describes a disease on the hands. Similar diseases also occur on the foot or on the penis. They are then called Ledderhose's disease (on the foot) or Induratio penis plastica (on the penis).

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Dupuytren contracture: symptoms

As a rule, Dupuytren's disease is painless. The patients first notice ring-shaped indurations on the ring finger and little finger. Over time, the flexor tendons of the affected fingers shorten. As a result, the fingers are fixed in the flexion position. Patients can stretch their fingers increasingly badly. In addition, the palmar fascia (palmar aponeurosis) scars, allowing patients to palpate small nodules on the palm of the hand.

The Dupuytren contracture often affects both hands. The expression of the contractures on the hands can be different.

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Dupuytren contracture: causes and risk factors

The exact cause of the Dupuytren contracture is not yet known. It is believed that genetic influences play a role in the formation. The course of the disease is also likely to be influenced by genetic information. For example, Dupuytren's disease is significantly faster and more severe in some people than in others.

Apart from the genetic component, other diseases also play a role in the development and course of Dupuytren's contracture. Many patients also suffer from diabetes mellitus. But also alcohol abuse or seizure disorders (epilepsy) are diseases, with which the Dupuytren contracture is more often associated.

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Dupuytren contracture: examinations and diagnosis

If you feel tensions in the palm of your hand and have difficulty moving, especially when stretching your fingers, consult a specialist in orthopedics. In the case of suspected Dupuytren's disease, he first asks you in detail about your medical history (anamnesis). He will ask you the following questions:

  • Do you have and restrictions on moving your hands?
  • Since when do the complaints exist?
  • Are both hands affected by the discomfort?
  • Does a blood relative suffer from or suffer from Dupuytren's disease?

Subsequently, your doctor will examine you physically. He looks at your hands to determine possible skin retractions. He then scans the palm of your hand to sense nodular changes or indurations on the palm or along the sides of the fingers. He then moves your fingers one at a time to assess the strength of the movement restrictions.

Dupuytren contracture: staging

Dupuytren's contracture is divided into various stages. A common classification is that of Tubiana. The strengths of the contractures of all fingers are recorded and classified as follows:

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