Diseases

Femoral

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A femoral (Femoral fracture, femoral hernia, femoral hernia) is a intestinal rupture, below the so-called inguinal ligament. The pain is often nonspecific and can radiate into the thigh. A femoral hernia is always operated because, for example, parts of the intestine can pinch. Read more about the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of femoral hernia here.

ICD codes for this disease: ICD codes are internationally valid medical diagnosis codes. They are found e.g. in medical reports or on incapacity certificates. K41ArtikelübersichtSchenkelhernie

  • description
  • symptoms
  • Causes and risk factors
  • Examinations and diagnosis
  • treatment
  • Disease course and prognosis

Femoral hernia: description

In femoral hernia, a so-called fractured bag everts through a weak spot in the tissue. This can be felt and seen by the doctor, especially with increased pressure in the abdomen. A femoral fracture consists of a Bruchpforte, a break bag and the Bruchinhalt. The hernia is at the femoral hernia a maximum of one centimeter and is located below the inguinal ligament on the thigh. The fracture sac often contains bowel parts.

About five percent of all hernias are femoral hernias. It occurs three times more often in the woman than in the husband, and affects in particular women in old age. In about 40 percent of the femoral hernias the hernia sac is already trapped at the time of diagnosis. Nine percent of women and 50 percent of men simultaneously suffer from inguinal hernia.

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Femoral hernia: symptoms

Femoral hernias usually cause no symptoms at the beginning. If pain occurs, it is often uncharacteristic and located in the inguinal region. Especially in case of physical stress, the pain in the thighs radiate, causing swelling in the groin. Sometimes the swelling is confused with a lymph node located there. When the hernia sac is trapped, the pain often radiates into the groin, stomach and inner thigh.

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Femoral Hernia: Causes and Risk Factors

The cause of femoral hernia is a weak spot in the tissue of the abdominal wall. This consists of abdominal muscle and connective tissue structures such as so-called aponeuroses and fascia, which ensure optimal stability. There are, however Gaps in the inguinal region that are not supported by either aponeurosis or muscle and thus constitute a natural weak spot.

This "breaking point" is located in the femoral hernia behind the inguinal ligament, where the vessels of the thigh run. Excessive pressure in the abdomen and weak connective tissue may cause femoral hernia.

Why the femoral hernia arises in some people is not yet clear. However, there are several causes that can favor femoral hernia:

These include in particular repeated pregnancies, obesity and an increasing collagen deficiency with age. In certain clinical pictures, such as Marfan syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, there is a congenital collagen metabolism disorder.

In addition, a femoral hernia often arises after an inguinal hernia operation - for example, by the surgical technique used. Coughing, pressing or heavy lifting also increase the pressure in the abdomen so that tissue can escape.

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Femoral hernia: examinations and diagnosis

If a femoral hernia occurs, you should consult a specialist in surgery and visceral surgery. The doctor first collects the medical history and then examines you exactly. Possible questions of the doctor can be:

  • Since when do the complaints exist?
  • Have you ever been operated on?
  • Does the pain radiate?
  • Do you have an accompanying disease that is associated with a collagen metabolism disorder?

The femoral hernia examines the doctor lying and standing. He asks you to squeeze vigorously. If he can feel the fracture sack below the inguinal ligament, the diagnosis can be made easily - in the case of overweight, the tactile findings are often difficult. With an ultrasound examination, the doctor can differentiate the femoral hernia of a inguinal hernia in larger fractures. Even swollen lymph nodes are excluded.

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