Diseases

Minipill

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send


The minipill is easily mistaken for the micropille. It also protects against hormonal re-pregnancy, but without estrogen. Unlike the micropillus, it does not affect breast milk and is particularly suitable for nursing women. Read here what distinguishes the mini from the micropillus, what advantages it offers and what you must pay attention to when using it.

The mini pill is the so-called estrogen-free pill, It contains only low concentrations of the luteal hormone progestin (levonorgestrel or desogestrel) and is therefore often called progestagen pill. Unlike the micropillus, the mini pill does not take a break. Regular delivery of the progestin thickens the mucus in the cervix and persists through the constant cycle of hormones throughout the cycle. Sperm can not pass through, and fertilization of the egg is thus avoided.

In addition, the luteal hormone effectively suppresses the structure of the uterine lining so that a possibly fertilized egg can not implant itself. In the so-called estrogen-free ovulation inhibitor, a newer variant of the mini-pill with the active ingredient desogestrel, in addition ovulation is suppressed.

How is the mini pill used?

Women who use the mini-pill for the first time take the first tablet on the first day of menstrual bleeding and are protected from conception from that point on.

Mini pill with levonorgestrel

The mini pill with levonorgestrel is considered obsolete. It requires a strict adherence to the time of taking. If you swallow the mini-pill with levonorgestrel three hours later than usual, there is no longer any safe contraceptive protection! Furthermore, levonorgestrel usually does not prevent ovulation, which reduces safety.

Mini Pill with Desogestrel

The "new mini pill" contains the progestin desogestrel and allows a larger time window when taking. Delays of up to 12 hours are possible here. Additional protection for this mini pill is that it does not ovulate while taking it. Thus, this estrogen-free ovulation inhibitor is as safe as the micropillus.

How safe is the mini-pill?

The Pearl index for assessing the safety of contraceptives varies from 0.5 to 3 depending on the mini-pill preparation. The smaller the value, the more effective the contraceptive method. A value of 0.5 means, for example, that within five years of contraception with the mini-pill, only five out of every 1,000 users become pregnant.

In long-term intestinal diseases with diarrhea and vomiting within four hours after taking the mini-pill, contraceptive protection is not guaranteed. You should then take a new pill or use a different method of contraception for up to seven days after the symptoms resolve.

Be careful when traveling with a time lag: Here you must - especially with mini pills with short deadlines - take special care not to forget a tablet!

Forget mini-pill - what now?

Get the forgotten mini-pill as fast as possible. Depending on which mini-pill you use, you have between three (levonorgestrel) and 12 hours (desogestrel) time. On the following days, continue the intake at the usual time of day.

If more than three or 12 hours have elapsed, you must also use a condom or diaphragm for contraception for the following seven days.

If you had sexual intercourse for up to a week before the forgotten tablet, you could still be pregnant despite the pill. In this case, consult your gynecologist. Maybe he will recommend you the "morning after pill".

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send