Diseases

Impingement syndrome

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The Impingement Syndrome (Bottleneck syndrome) describes a painful entrapment of tendons or muscles within a joint. This can lead to painful movement restrictions. The shoulder joint is most commonly affected by impingement syndrome, followed by the hip joint. It is treated with analgesics, physiotherapy and surgery. Here you can read all important information about the impingement syndrome.

ICD codes for this disease: ICD codes are internationally valid medical diagnosis codes. They are found e.g. in medical reports or on incapacity certificates. M75M24Article OverviewImpingement Syndrome

  • description
  • Impingement syndrome on the shoulder
  • Impingement syndrome at the hip
  • symptoms
  • Causes and risk factors
  • Examinations and diagnosis
  • treatment
  • Disease course and prognosis

Impingement syndrome: description

The Impingement Syndrome (bottleneck syndrome) describes a painful entrapment of tendons or Gelenkkapselanteilen (soft tissues) within the joint space. As a result, the tendons can no longer glide unrestrictedly in the joint space. In most cases, this leads to degenerative changes, which are associated with limited mobility of the joint.

The impingement syndrome usually manifests on the shoulder joint. About ten percent of the German population (about the same age as men and women around the age of 50) are affected by this. Often, the impingement syndrome also occurs at the hip joint. Rarely do patients suffer from an ankle impingement syndrome.

Two forms of impingement syndrome

The impingement syndrome can be divided into two forms, depending on which structures are compressed:

The primary Outlet Impingement Syndrome is due to a change in the bony structures, such as a bone spur or an excessively inclined bone roof.

The secondary Non-outlet impingement syndrome is the result of another illness or injury that reduces the joint space. These include, for example, inflammation of the bursa (bursitis) as well as damage to tendons or muscles.

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Impingement syndrome on the shoulder

Everything important about the congestion syndrome in the shoulder area read in the article Impingement - shoulder.

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Impingement syndrome at the hip

Everything important about the bottleneck syndrome in the hip area read in the post
Impingement - hip.

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Impingement Syndrome: Symptoms

The impingement syndrome causes different symptoms depending on the affected joint. In general, the patients suffer from pain that usually increases under stress and lead to a restraint.

Symptoms - shoulder joint

When the impingement syndrome occurs at the shoulder joint, early stage patients report acute onset of pain, which occurs discretely at rest and increases under exercise (especially over-the-head activities). Patients can often indicate a triggering situation (stress, cold influence, injury). The pain is described as lying deeply in the joint and often increases at night, so that lying on the affected side is hardly possible anymore. Raising the arm more than 60 degrees from the starting position (arm hangs loose) is no longer possible for most patients. In the further course, adhesions and adhesions of the bursa in the shoulder joint area (Bursa subacromialis) can occur, which aggravates the painful restriction of movement. Due to the pain-related reduction of muscle activity, the muscles disappear very easily, and the joint loses stability.

Symptoms - hip joint

The impingement syndrome often shows a very creeping onset of the hip at the hip joint. In the beginning, pain of the hip joint occurs only sporadically and is often described by the patient as groin pain. The pain, however, increases with physical activity and then emanate often in the thigh. In most cases, they are strengthened when the leg, which is bent at 90 degrees, is turned inwards (internal rotation with 90 degrees flexion).

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