Diseases

Myocarditis

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Martina Feichter

Martina Feichter studied biology in Innsbruck with an optional subject in pharmacy and also immersed herself in the world of medicinal plants. From there it was not far to other medical topics that still captivate her today. She trained as a journalist at the Axel Springer Academy in Hamburg and has been working for lifelikeinc.com since 2007 - first as an editor and since 2012 as a freelance author.

More about the lifelikeinc.com experts Myocarditis (Myocarditis) is a serious condition. It often develops as a result of influenza infections. Their symptoms are often difficult to detect, which makes a quick diagnosis difficult. In severe cases, myocarditis may cause heart failure or severe cardiac arrhythmias. Then there is even a risk of sudden cardiac death. Read here how you can recognize myocarditis, how it develops and how to treat it.

ICD codes for this disease: ICD codes are internationally valid medical diagnosis codes. They are found e.g. in medical reports or on incapacity certificates. I09I51I41I01I40ArtikelübersichtHerzmuskelentzündung

  • symptoms
  • Triggers & Causes
  • risks
  • Examinations and diagnosis
  • treatment
  • Disease course and prognosis
  • Prevent
Heart Muscle Inflammation - TreatmentWhy work and sports are taboo for patients with heart muscle inflammation and who needs to take medication.Why work and sports are taboo for patients with heart muscle inflammation and who must take medication.To the table of contents

Quick Overview

  • What is a heart muscle inflammation? Inflammation of the heart muscle cells and usually also of the surrounding tissue as well as the heart-supplying blood vessels (coronary vessels). If the inflammation reaches the pericardium, it is called perimyocarditis.
  • symptoms: often no or hardly noticeable symptoms such as increased heart palpitations and heart stumbling; possibly pain in the chest, cardiac arrhythmias and signs of heart failure in advanced myocarditis (such as water retention in the lower legs)
  • Trigger: In infectious myocarditis it is pathogens such as viruses (such as cold, flu, herpes, measles or Coxsackie viruses) or bacteria (for example, the causative agent of tonsillitis, scarlet fever, diphtheria or blood poisoning). The non-infectious myocarditis arises, for example, due to faulty immune reactions, radiotherapy or drugs.
  • risks: Possible consequences include a diseased enlarged heart muscle (dilated cardiomyopathy) with chronic heart failure and severe cardiac arrhythmia. There is a risk of sudden cardiac death.
  • Treatment: V. A. physical protection and bed rest, possibly drugs against the pathogens of infectious myocarditis (such as antibiotics against bacteria); Treatment of complications, e.g. Heart-burdening medicines for heart failure (such as beta-blockers)
  • Forecast: With consistent physical protection the myocarditis usually heals without consequences. Otherwise, long-term consequences such as heart failure threaten. Rarely, the heart muscle inflammation ends fatally.

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