Diseases

Orlistat

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The active substance orlistat inhibits fat digestion and is used as an anti-obesity drug. For the most part, it is not absorbed into the body through the intestine, which hardly causes any serious side effects. Here you read everything interesting about orlistat, side effects and application.

ArtikelübersichtOrlistat
  • operation
  • application areas
  • Proper application
  • side effects
  • Important instructions
  • tax provisions
  • history

This is how Orlistat works

After ingestion of dietary fat, the stomach and pancreas release certain fat-splitting enzymes called lipases. By moving the muscle walls of the digestive tract, the food slurry is mixed with the enzyme-containing digestive juices. The lipases split the dietary fats into their building blocks (glycerol and fatty acids), which can then be absorbed through the intestinal wall.

Orlistat is a so-called lipase inhibitor: It blocks the lipases in the stomach and small intestine. Without enzymatic cleavage, however, dietary fats can not enter the bloodstream and are instead excreted with the stool. Since fat is the nutrient with the highest calorie density (about 39 kilojoules per gram or 9.3 kilocalories per gram of fat), inhibiting fat digestion can effectively lower calorie intake. This is especially useful in overweight people to support the weight loss after a fundamental diet change.

After taking Orlistat, the active ingredient begins to act directly in the stomach and intestine. It is absorbed only in traces through the intestine into the blood and passes largely unchanged the intestine.

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When is orlistat used?

The active substance orlistat is used in conjunction with a reduced-calorie diet in patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. For existing risk factors, the lipase inhibitor is given even at a BMI of 28 or more. If at least five percent of the starting weight was not taken 12 weeks after the start of the treatment, treatment should be discontinued.

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This is how Orlistat is used

The active substance Orlistat is used in the form of capsules or chewable tablets. One capsule or chewable tablet containing up to 120 milligrams of orlistat is taken immediately before, during or up to one hour after a main meal. The intake should only take place if the meal contains fats or oils.

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What side effects does Orlistat have?

During treatment, more than one in ten patients will experience orlistat side effects such as headache, respiratory infections, abdominal pain, fatty stools, bloating with stool, stool urges, and fluid stools.

Other side effects with every tenth to one hundredth treatment include fatigue, menstrual cramps, anxiety, urinary tract infections, rectal pain (rectal pain), faecal incontinence, and dental and gum complaints.

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