Diseases

Glyburide

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Of the Active ingredient glibenclamide is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to the group of oral hypoglycemic agents, so unlike insulin it can simply be used as a tablet, which considerably improves the adherence and acceptance of the patients. Here you will learn everything you need to know about glibenclamide: use, mode of action as well as side effects and interactions.

ArtikelübersichtGlibenclamid
  • operation
  • application areas
  • Proper application
  • side effects
  • Important instructions
  • tax provisions
  • history

This is how glibenclamide works

Diabetes mellitus ("honey-sweet flow") is a metabolic disease, commonly known as diabetes. It is associated with high blood sugar levels, frequent urination and sweet urine. The reason for this is an absolute or relative lack of insulin - the hormone responsible for the absorption of sugar from the blood into the body's cells.

There are two main types of diabetes: In Type 1 diabetes, the body can hardly or not produce any insulin because the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed by the body's own antibodies. In this form of diabetes is thus an absolute insulin deficiency.

Unlike type 2 diabetes: Here there is a relative insulin deficiency - the body cells are increasingly insensitive to insulin (insulin resistance). Over time, insulin production also decreases.

Glibenclamide - a member of the so-called sulfonylureas - helps fight relative insulin deficiency. It ensures that the beta cells in the pancreas release more insulin when stimulated than otherwise. This improves the absorption of sugar in the cells and thus lowers the blood sugar level.

Uptake, breakdown and excretion of glibenclamide

After taking glibenclamide, the active ingredient in the intestine is absorbed into the blood. After one to two hours, the highest blood levels are reached. Glibenclamide reaches the pancreas via the bloodstream and unfolds its effect there. It is broken down via the liver and about half of it is excreted via the urine and the stool.

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When is glibenclamide used?

Glibenclamide is used in non-insulin-dependent forms of diabetes (type 2 diabetes) in adults, but only when non-pharmacological measures (reduction of obesity, much exercise, diet) could not normalize blood sugar levels. The active substance may be prescribed alone or in combination with other oral antidiabetics such as metformin.

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So, glibenclamide is used

The antidiabetic agent glibenclamide is taken in the form of tablets. At the beginning of the treatment, it begins "creeping in", that is, starting with a very low dose, which is slowly increased. This prevents the blood sugar level from falling too quickly at the beginning because it can cause dizziness and malaise. The final dose is usually increased at 3.5 to 10.5 milligrams of glibenclamide per day. Depending on the dose, it is taken either once a day (in the morning before breakfast) or twice a day (in the morning and in the evening before meals). Especially at the beginning, but also in the course of treatment, the blood sugar level should be checked regularly.

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What side effects does Glibenclamide have?

The most common side effect during treatment with glibenclamide is low blood sugar, which is an excessively high blood sugar level. The signs are cold sweats, tremors, palpitations, hunger and discomfort. For such emergencies, patients should always have glucose with them, as in extreme cases unconsciousness can occur.

A common side effect of glibenclamide is also weight gain. Occasionally, side effects such as nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, skin reactions (such as itching, redness, swelling) and photosensitivity may also develop.

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