Diseases

Colchicine

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The active substance colchicine is a naturally occurring substance of the autumn timeless, a poisonous plant. In the right dosage, the drug is a valuable therapeutic for the treatment of acute gout attack. Colchicine is very toxic in higher doses. Here you can read everything worth knowing about the active substance colchicine: effect, application as well as possible changes and side effects.

ArtikelübersichtColchicin
  • operation
  • application areas
  • Proper application
  • side effects
  • Important instructions
  • tax provisions
  • history

This is how Colchicine works

The gout remedy Colchicin can alleviate the sometimes very severe pain in acute gout attacks very effectively. Gout is a metabolic disease in which the uric acid concentration in the blood is increased. If it exceeds a certain limit, part of the uric acid precipitates in the form of crystals and deposits in the tissue, for example in synovial fluid. The presence of these small crystals damages the joint in a similar way as sand in the transmission: The articular cartilage is destroyed and the joint becomes inflamed. With the inflammatory reaction, the body tries to do something against the uric acid crystals - white blood cells, which release inflammatory messenger substances, migrate to the affected joint. The inflammatory process of the joints occurs in gout in very painful spurts.

Colchicine can help against such gout attacks. It inhibits the ability of white blood cells to target the site of inflammation. In addition, the drug prevents these cells from actively "fueling" the inflammatory response.

In addition, colchicine is also a dangerous mitotic poison. Mitosis is cell division. Cells that divide first double their chromosomes - that is, their genetic material - so that the two resulting daughter cells each receive a complete set of chromosomes. Colchicine inhibits certain proteins that allow the division of the chromosomes on the new cells. As a result, the daughter cells are not viable and die.

Absorption, breakdown and excretion of colchicine

After taking the drug passes through the intestine into the bloodstream and unfolds there effect on the blood cells. It is transported through the kidneys with urine as well as through the bile with the stool out of the body. In this way, after four to five hours, about half of the active ingredient has left the body again.

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When is colchicine used?

In Germany, the active substance is only approved for the treatment of acute attacks of gout.

Outside its off-label use, colchicine is also sometimes used to prevent gout attacks and to treat familial Mediterranean fever, a rare genetic disease.

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This is how colchicine is used

When an acute attack of gout occurs, one milligram of colchicine in the form of drops or tablets is taken at the beginning. If the symptoms persist, take another milligram every one to two hours until the attack subsides - but not more than eight milligrams in 24 hours and twelve milligrams per episode. Thereafter, colchicine must not be taken for at least three days so that the body can completely eliminate the administered gout remedy and recover.

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What side effects does colchicine have?

The active ingredient colchicine acts primarily on division-active tissue. Apart from the desired effect on the white blood cells, it particularly affects the intestinal mucosa, which explains the frequent side effects in the gastrointestinal tract.

Taking more doses of colchicine may cause diarrhea in one in ten people. This side effect should be taken very seriously with the gout and the application should then be stopped immediately.

One in ten to one hundred patients has side effects in the form of nausea, abdominal pain and cramps, vomiting, drowsiness, muscle aches and muscle weakness.

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