Diseases

To measure ones pulse

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send


The To measure ones pulse by hand is one of the most important investigations in medicine. By palpating an artery, one can draw conclusions about the frequency and quality of the heartbeat and the circulatory situation. Read here how to measure the pulse correctly and what information about your health he gives!

Article overview Measure pulse

  • What is pulse measuring?
  • When do you have to measure the pulse?
  • How do you measure the pulse?
  • What are the risks of measuring a pulse?
  • What do you have to consider when measuring pulses?

What is pulse measuring?

Measuring the pulse means that one feels the pressure wave of the blood passing through the arteries and describes its character and its frequency. The safest way to do this is at a point where an artery runs just under the skin, such as the wrist or the lateral front neck below the lower jaw. In an emergency, in very bad circulatory conditions or in special medical issues, the pulse is often felt in other places, such as in the groin, the popliteal fossa or on the back of the foot.

Measuring the right pulse How and where can you feel your pulse? And what should be considered when measuring the pulse, how and where can you feel your pulse? And what should be considered in the pulse measurement?

What is the pulse?

The pulse is the pressure wave that arises in the arteries as the heart contracts (contractes) and pumps blood into the systemic circulation. This pressure wave propagates through all arteries into the capillaries. Its character (strength and dynamics) depends on the rhythm and rate of contraction of the (left) ventricle, the function of the corresponding heart valve (aortic valve), the elasticity and wall tension of the aorta and the arteries branching from it as well as the blood volume.

Therefore, pulse measurement can give the experienced examiner a wealth of information and clues to pathological changes, such as:

  • Training condition and physical stress
  • mental stress and stress
  • Arrhythmia
  • Lack of fluid or blood loss
  • Infections or septic shock
  • reduced elasticity or calcification of the arteries
  • Obstacles or blockages in the arteries

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send