Diseases

Auscultation

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Under the auscultation one understands the listening of the body. Auscultation is one of the basic methods of physical examination besides inspection (viewing), palpation (palpation) and percussion (tapping). Read here how the doctor can determine heart, lung and intestinal diseases by auscultation and when the examination is necessary.

ArtikelübersichtAuskultation

  • What is an auscultation?
  • When do you do an auscultation?
  • What do you do with an auscultation?
  • What are the risks of auscultation?
  • What should I pay attention to after auscultation?

What is an auscultation?

Auscultation is a useful and rapid examination of the chest and abdominal area, where the doctor can hear better the sounds of the organs with the help of a stethoscope and thus conclude on the state of health. The stethoscope consists of two earhooks, a tube and a chestpiece with a membrane that is placed on the skin. This is vibrated by acoustic waves (sounds from inside the body) and transmits the sounds via the hose to the earhooks in the ears of the examiner. Healthy and natural sounds are called physiological and pathological.

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When do you do an auscultation?

Lungs and heart are among the most frequently auscultated organs, as above all here pathological noises give the doctor quickly and easily evidence of possible diseases: With a cardiac auscultation can damage and diseases (such as inflammation) of the heart valves and the heart itself diagnose. Lung auscultation is used in cases of suspected pneumonia, diseases such as asthma and COPD or lung collapse and pleural effusion.

Even bowel sounds can be auscultated well. For example, this helps the doctor distinguish between a mechanical and a paralytic bowel obstruction.

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