Diseases

NSE (neuron-specific enolase)

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send


The enzyme NSE is measured primarily in cancer patients in order to assess disease progression. Read here what NSE is exactly, which standard values ​​apply and in which cases changed measured values ​​occur!

Article OverviewNSE (Neuron Specific Enolase)

  • What is NSE?
  • When is the NSE value determined?
  • NSE: standard value
  • When is the NSE value too low?
  • When is the NSE value too high?

What is NSE?

The abbreviation NSE stands for "neuron-specific enolase" or "neuron-specific enolase". This is an enzyme that plays an important role in sugar metabolism. It occurs above all in nerve cells and in so-called neuroendocrine cells. These are special nerve cells that release hormones or other secretions on the signal from other nerve cells.

To the table of contents

When is the NSE value determined?

In laboratory medicine, NSE plays an important role as a tumor marker in certain cancers. The enzyme is measured to estimate the course of the disease, the success of the therapy and the prognosis of the patient.

NSE is mainly determined as a tumor marker in patients with a specific lung cancer (small cell lung carcinoma), neuroblastoma (childhood neoplasm of the nervous tissue) or seminoma (germ cell tumor of the testis).

The concentration may also be increased in benign diseases.

To the table of contents

NSE: standard value

The NSE concentration is usually determined in the blood serum. The so-called cut-off value in adults is generally 12.5 micrograms per liter (Ug / l). The cut-off value is the threshold above which a test result is considered positive. For NSE levels below the cut-off value, the test is negative.

Attention: The cut-off values ​​are method and laboratory dependent!

To the table of contents

When is the NSE value too low?

A downward deviation is medically not significant.

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send