Diseases

SCC (Squamous cell carcinoma antigen)

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send


The SCC is a tumor marker. So there are indications of the course of certain cancers. However, some benign diseases can also affect SCC. Read here what SCC is exactly, which measured values ​​are considered normal and what changed SCC values ​​can mean!

Product overviewSCC (Squamous cell carcinoma antigen)

  • What is SCC?
  • When is the SCC value determined?
  • SCC standard value
  • When is the SCC value too low?
  • When is the SCC value too high?

What is SCC?

SCC is the abbreviation for Squamous cell carcinoma antigen. It is a glycoprotein, a protein with attached sugar residues. There are different subgroups of SCC. They are produced in the covering cells of the mucous membranes of certain organs, for example in the lungs and in the cervix.

To the table of contents

When is the SCC value determined?

SCC is a tumor marker because it may be elevated in certain tissue growths (tumors). The determination of the laboratory value is usually used to estimate the course of the disease and the success of the therapy. The SCC measurement serves as a supplement to other findings.

To the table of contents

SCC standard value

SCC is mostly determined in blood serum. In healthy individuals its concentration is below five micrograms per liter (<5 μg / l).

To the table of contents

When is the SCC value too low?

Insufficient SCC values ​​are not important.

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send