Diseases

Leukocytes in the urine

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Martina Feichter

Martina Feichter studied biology in Innsbruck with an optional subject in pharmacy and also immersed herself in the world of medicinal plants. From there it was not far to other medical topics that still captivate her today. She trained as a journalist at the Axel Springer Academy in Hamburg and has been working for lifelikeinc.com since 2007 - first as an editor and since 2012 as a freelance author.

More about the lifelikeinc.com expertsThe number of leukocytes in the urine it is determined to be able to diagnose a possible urinary tract infection. Occasionally, however, leukocytes are also detectable in urine in other diseases. Read all important information about the increased occurrence of white blood cells in the urine!

Article overviewLeucocytes in urine

  • What is a leukocyturia?
  • reason
  • How to determine leukocytes in urine

What is a leukocyturia?

Normally only isolated white blood cells (leukocytes) are found in the urine. For larger quantities, the doctor speaks of a leukocyturia. The standard limit is about five leucocytes per microliter of spontanurin.

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Leukocytes in the urine: cause

An increased amount of leukocytes in urine usually indicates an inflammatory disease of the kidneys and / or the urinary tract. The leukocytes in the urine had previously as immune cells of the immune system the task to remove bacterial pathogens from kidney, urinary bladder or urethra. Thereafter, they were excreted in the urine. Mostly the bacterial pathogens are found in the urine at the same time.

However, leukocyturia does not only occur in a urinary tract infection. Thus, inflammation of the prostate or epididymis and gynecological diseases can lead to leukocyturia.

Sometimes there are too many white blood cells in the urine, but no bacteria. Physicians then speak of a "sterile leukocyturia." The cause may be, for example, a Urogenitaltuberkulose - ie a tuberculosis infestation of the kidneys, urinary tract and genital organs the case that is already being treated with antibiotics or caused by hard-to-grow bacteria (such as chlamydia or urea plasmas).

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