Diseases

Calcitonin

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calcitonin(also calcitonin) is a hormone that controls the levels of calcium and phosphate in the blood. It does so by developing its effect on the bone and kidney. Calcitonin is produced by special cells in the thyroid gland and, after its release, degrades within the kidney within a few minutes. Read here how the hormone works, which diseases change the calcitonin level and when the doctor administers the hormone for therapy.

ArtikelübersichtCalcitonin

  • What is calcitonin?
  • When do you determine calcitonin?
  • Calcitonin standard values
  • When is the level of calcitonin lowered?
  • When is the calcitonin level increased?
  • What to do if the calcitonin level changes?

What is calcitonin?

Calcitonin is an important hormone in human metabolism. It lowers blood calcium and phosphate levels by affecting bone and kidney cells. Its antagonist is the parathyroid hormone, which accordingly increases the calcium and phosphate in the blood.

How does calcitonin develop?

Calcitonin is made up of 32 different amino acids (protein building blocks). It is produced in special thyroid cells, the so-called C-cells. Other organs that produce calcitonin to a lesser extent are the parathyroid gland and the thymus. If the calcium level in the blood rises sharply, the C cells release the calcitonin formed. The excretion of the hormone is mainly via the kidneys.

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