Diseases

Frontotemporal dementia

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The Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a rarer form of dementia. She was formerly also called Pick's disease or Pick's disease. Unlike other forms of dementia, memory is largely preserved here. Instead, FTD patients show conspicuous and antisocial behavior. Only later does the frontotemporal dementia resemble Alzheimer's dementia. Read more about Frontotemporal Dementia: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis and Therapy!

ICD codes for this disease: ICD codes are internationally valid medical diagnosis codes. They are found e.g. in medical reports or on incapacity certificates. G31Article OverviewFrontotemporal Dementia

  • description
  • symptoms
  • Causes and risk factors
  • diagnosis
  • treatment
  • Course and prognosis

Frontotemporal dementia: description

The term frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is colloquially used for a group of disorders whose main symptoms are changes in personality, social behavior and language skills. The technical term for this group of diseases is actually frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The FTD is strictly speaking only a sub-form of the FTLD. In total, there are three such subforms:

  1. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)
  2. Semantic dementia
  3. Progressive non-fluid aphasia

Also in this article, the term frontotemporal dementia is simplified for the frontotemporal lobar degenerations.

Previously, this syndrome was also called Pick's disease or Pick's disease.

Frontotemporal dementia: frequency

Frontotemporal dementia is a rare form of dementia. It accounts for approximately three to nine percent of all dementia. The disease breaks out on average between the ages of 50 and 60; However, the range of the age of onset is very large: it is 20 to 85 years. According to studies, frontotemporal dementia is equally common in men and women.

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Frontotemporal dementia: symptoms

Nerve cells in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain are the cause of frontotemporal dementia. Among other things, the symptoms depend on which part of the cerebrum exactly the nerve cells die off.

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