Diseases

Sebaceous gland

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The sebaceous gland (Glandula sebacea) is an all-body gland located in the dermis (corium) and mostly bound to hair. The sebaceous gland discharges into the covering of the hair (hair follicles or hair follicles) and releases its greasy secretions on the skin surface. Read everything important about the sebaceous gland!

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  • What is the sebaceous gland?
  • What problems can a sebaceous gland cause?

What is the sebaceous gland?

The sebaceous gland is an exocrine gland, meaning it releases its secretions outwards. The glandular body consists of large sebaceous cells that are filled with fat droplets. Renewed cells, which are produced from below (from the basal membrane), push the upper cells ever further towards the surface of the skin until ultimately they can no longer be nourished. In their innermost area, these cells then dissolve completely and get as a fat slurry over the hair follicle - most sebaceous glands form a unit with one hair - to the skin surface. There, they coat the skin and hair with sebum, a thin, protective layer of fat that prevents it from drying out. The sebum also protects against skin diseases, pathogens and chemicals.

Sebaceous glands are so-called holocrine glands, whose secretory cells completely disintegrate while releasing their secretions. From below they are replaced by new cells.

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Where do most sebaceous glands sit?

Especially many sebaceous glands are located on the scalp, nose, ear, genital area, in the T-zone (in the face) and in the front and rear weld channel on the trunk.

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