Diseases

Achilles tendon

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The Achilles tendon connects the calf muscles with the heel bone. It begins approximately in the middle of the lower leg, is broad at first, then narrower and at the lower end wider again and ends at the heel bone. It is one of the strongest tendons of the body. Read here everything important about anatomy and function of the Achilles tendon as well as common diseases and injuries!

Article overview Achilles tendon

  • What is the Achilles tendon?
  • What function does the Achilles tendon have?
  • Where is the Achilles tendon?
  • What problems can the Achilles tendon cause?

What is the Achilles tendon?

The strong, but less elastic tendon connects the lower leg muscles with the foot skeleton. Without them, it would not be possible to stretch the foot and thus walk or toe. The Achilles tendon is about 20 to 25 inches long, at the thickest point up to 5 inches wide and up to 8 millimeters thick.

According to Greek legend, Achilles was dipped by his mother in the river Styx to make him immortal. However, the heel she had held him to remained vulnerable - the much cited Achilles heel.

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What function does the Achilles tendon have?

The Achilles tendon is used to transfer power from the calf muscles to the foot skeleton, or more precisely the heel bone. When the calf muscles contract, the tendon on the heel bone is pulled up, the heel is lifted and the foot is stretched. By relaxing the calf muscles, however, an occurrence with the entire sole of the foot is possible.

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