Diseases

Cheekbone

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The cheekbone or Os zygomaticum is a part of the facial skull. It connects the upper jaw with the temporal bone and the sphenoid bone with the frontal bone. Towards the center of the face, it limits the eye socket. The zygoma, and especially the zygomatic arch, which is formed on each side of the temporal and zygomatic processes, essentially determines the shape of the face. Read everything important about the cheekbone!

Article overview cheekbone

  • What is the zygomatic bone?
  • What is the function of the zygomatic bone?
  • Where is the zygomatic bone?
  • What problems can the zygomatic bone cause?

What is the zygomatic bone?

The zygomatic bone is a nearly square, paired bone of the facial skull. It owes its name to the fact that it represents like a yoke the connection between the facial skull and the lateral cranial wall. The zygomatic bone is the bony base of the cheek and determines to a good extent the appearance of the face.

The zygomatic bone has three surfaces: one forms the cheek surface (Facies lateralis), the strongest protruding part. A second (facies orbitalis) forms the border to the eye-socket (orbita), and the third represents the connection to the temporal bone (os frontale).

The zygomatic arch

The zygomatic arch (zygomatic arch) is formed on each side of the face by an appendage of the temporal bone (zygomatic processus) and the zygomatic bone (temporal procession). He pulls on the lower edge of the eye socket horizontally to the ear.

From the lower margin of the zygomatic arch originates the superficial part of the muscle masseter (Musculus masseter), which attaches near the jaw angle. The deep part of this muscle arises from the inner surface of the zygomatic arch, pulls down and attaches to the pine branch. This anatomical position gains importance in a rupture of the zygomatic bone.

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What is the function of the zygomatic bone?

The zygomatic bone has a strong appendage, the maxillary process (maxillary process), which absorbs the pressure created during chewing in the upper jaw and transmits it to the frontal bone via another extension in the center of the face (processus frontalis). Via a lateral process (temporal process) the masticatory pressure is transmitted to the temporal bone via the zygomatic arch.

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Where is the zygomatic bone?

The cheekbone is slightly laterally in the face, approximately at the level of the eyes and slightly below. It is adjacent to the upper jawbone, the tearbone, the frontal bone and the temporal bone.

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What problems can the zygomatic bone cause?

A Jochbogenfraktur arises by direct impact force on the Jochbogen, approximately with a punch in the face. Under certain circumstances, the masticatory muscle may get into the bone gap and become trapped. This hinders the opening or closing of the mouth ("jaw clamp").

A fracture elsewhere in the zygomatic bone is called zygomatic fracture: It accounts for almost half of all midface fractures and is the most common facial skull injury. Often the zygomatic fracture does not occur in isolation, but together with the fracture of other facial bones, such as in the maxillary sinus fracture.

A bony inflammation of the zygomatic arch is called (zygomatizitis). It often develops as a result of inflammation of the mastoid (mastoid of the temporal bone) or middle ear inflammation and is accompanied by, among other things, a swelling.

Swelling above the cheekbone also occur as a result of trigeminal neuralgia.

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